Saturday, December 20, 2014

Christmas Bird Counts (Fountain 12-17-14 and Colorado Springs 12-20-14)

5 miles 12-17 at Fountain and 10 miles 12-20 at Colorado Springs areas 6b and 12b.  (200 runtotal)

Bushtits @ Willow Springs Ponds 12/17

Brown Creeper

Ruby Crowned Kinglet

Great Blue Heron (Fountain count)

American Wigeon


Intergrade Northern Flicker (Fountain count)

Double-crested Cormorant (Colorado Springs count @ Willow Springs)



American Kestrel


Tanja and I finishing up 12b - from dawn to dusk!

Mule deer

Saturday, December 06, 2014

Red Rock Open Space 12/6/14

5.5 mile hike (185 runtotal). There are fossils, etc., in the open space. Watched for coyotes lounge about and sort of stalk some deer for awhile east of the hogbacks - looks like they may have mange, though. :( The city government page has this blurb about the area - "Activity on Red Rock Canyon dates back to 7000 B.C., during the Archaic Stage. Due to its close proximity to Fountain Creek and its abundant wildlife, this was an ideal location for settlement. During the late 1800s the property provided many building supplies for Old Colorado City and the surrounding communities. Material taken from the quarries included Gypsum, building sand and sandstone blocks. The Kenmuir Quarry, mined during this time, was open seven days a week due to demand. Declining demand for stone and increased demand for concrete and steel, forced the quarry to close in the early part of the 20th Century. Opening in 1886, the Colorado-Philadelphia Company Mill used the land to refine the ore shipped by train from the gold mines in Cripple Creek. It was the largest mill of its kind in the United States, until the new Golden Cycle Mill was built in the early part of the 1900s. John George Bock purchased the property in the 1920s-1930s and later willed it to his two sons. John S. Bock, the eldest son, continued to live there until his death in 2002. The family had grand plans for the property including a resort community with convention center, high-rise towers, commercial centers and a golf course. In the end, they were only able to build a few residences and outbuildings, two dozen mobile home sites, a 53-acre landfill, and two gravel quarries. In 2003, the City of Colorado Springs purchased the Red Rock Canyon property to be used as public open space."